Vila Franca do Campo, São Miguel, Azores. 2015 Fieldwork Short Report.

In September 2015, the Armedea Project completed the first archaeological evaluation in Vila Franca do Campo, island of São Miguel, Azores (Portugal). The fieldwork was carried out by the Department of Archaeology of Durham University and the Centro de História d’Aquém e d’Além-Mar (CHAM), Universidade Nova de Lisboa – Universidade dos Açores, with the participation of the School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia.… Read More Vila Franca do Campo, São Miguel, Azores. 2015 Fieldwork Short Report.

Fieldwork in “El Castillejo” – Guajar Faragüit, Granada, Spain

Between the end of April and the beginning of May 2015, fieldwork was carried out at the fortified Arab village of El Castillejo, Guajar Faragüit, Granada (Spain). Built on the top of an isolated hill facing the village of Guajar Faragüit, its surface of ca. 1.5 ha (120 m x 130 m) is clearly defined… Read More Fieldwork in “El Castillejo” – Guajar Faragüit, Granada, Spain

Medieval buildings affected by the 1976 Friuli earthquake

Earthquakes produce widespread damage to buildings, infrastructures and landscape. Historical buildings are significantly exposed to seismic risk,  and in many seismogenic areas their preservation is often threatened by seismic hazard. Many recent earthquakes in Italy (Friuli 1976, Umbria 1997, Abruzzo 2009, Emilia 2012) affected several medieval buildings, such as the Basilica of San Francesco di… Read More Medieval buildings affected by the 1976 Friuli earthquake

Quantifying seismic effects on European populations and economic activities during the Middle Ages.

New maps on population density during the Middle Ages Thanks to national and international historical seismic catalogues, we already know with accuracy where earthquakes occurred during the high and late Middle Ages in Europe. The real unknown is to gauge how great the impact of these seismic events was on societies and their economies. GIS data management allows… Read More Quantifying seismic effects on European populations and economic activities during the Middle Ages.

Armedea GIS Database – first steps

The Armedea GIS database has been defined in order to collate archaeological evidence relating to medieval seismic activity, such as data from excavations, architectural evidence preserved on standing buildings, and environmental effects such as tsunamis and landslides. The database therefore presents a hierarchical structure that, for each event, allows the organisation of general information relating to… Read More Armedea GIS Database – first steps